Charming historical fiction: The Familiars and The Foundling by Stacey Halls (mini book reviews)

Stacey Halls is one of the writers I discovered through a fellow blogger - Chantelle from Wild Library Blog. After reading her review of The Familiars, I knew I have to read the book ... and it was love at first page read. It's no wonder that I continued the journey with reading The Foundling, … Continue reading Charming historical fiction: The Familiars and The Foundling by Stacey Halls (mini book reviews)

Not all that is hidden is lost: Metronome by Tom Watson (book review)

Metronome by Tom Watson caught my interest because it is about an unusual imprisonment situation. From the description is sounded spooky, adrenaline-rushing, and totally captivating - it did not disappoint! Metronome in a nutshell Aina and Whitney are in prison, for 12 years. Their prison does not have any locks or barred windows, but a … Continue reading Not all that is hidden is lost: Metronome by Tom Watson (book review)

Childhood memories from the 1960s Transylvania: The Innocents (Inocentii) by Ioana Parvulescu (book review)

Earlier this year I decided to start reading contemporary authors from my home country - Romania 🇷🇴. That's how I got to read The Innocents by Ioana Parvulescu - a book I received from a dear friend on my wedding day, when she (secretly) coordinated with all my friends so that each one brings a … Continue reading Childhood memories from the 1960s Transylvania: The Innocents (Inocentii) by Ioana Parvulescu (book review)

The history of a Vietnamese family over a stormy century: The Mountains Sing by Nguyễn Phan Quế Mai (book review)

One of my favourite parts of blogging is receiving amazing book recommendations from readers all over the world ❤ For instance, I found out about The Mountains Sing from Carl from The Pine-Scented Chronicles - he recommended this book as answer to a discussion post about why we should read stories about cultures that are different from our … Continue reading The history of a Vietnamese family over a stormy century: The Mountains Sing by Nguyễn Phan Quế Mai (book review)

A reversed story of slavery where Africans enslave Europeans: Blonde Roots by Bernardine Evaristo (book review)

I was wandering around a lovely bookstore, looking for a gift, when I saw THEM - the 2 books by Bernardine Evaristo from the same collection as the book I already owned and loved reading: Girl, Woman, Other (my review). To buy or not to buy? Well, I remember picking them up and then putting … Continue reading A reversed story of slavery where Africans enslave Europeans: Blonde Roots by Bernardine Evaristo (book review)

A modern classic on being Black in the 21st century: Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (book review)

Last year I asked my best friends to share their favourites books of 2020 - see here the post. Americanah was one of the stories mentioned, one of the stories that I really wanted to read and see for myself why it was chosen as favourite. Well, it seems like Americanah might also make it … Continue reading A modern classic on being Black in the 21st century: Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (book review)

The award for the most consuming and heartrending book I’ve ever read goes to: A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara (book review)

I must have heard of A Little Life from other bloggers. None of my friends read it, something I found out when I was craving to discuss it with someone. So - thank you, dear bloggers, for bringing A Little Life to my life.

Before and after the water crisis hits the Earth: The End of the Ocean by Maja Lunde (book review)

More than one year ago I read my first climate fiction book - The History of Bees by Maja Lunde. Ever since I've been (not so) patiently waiting for the release of the second book of the series - The End of the Ocean. Read it, loved it, ready to share my thoughts with you!

What happens after wiping out humanity: MaddAddam by Margaret Atwood (book review)

There's something bittersweet about finishing a series of books. The bitter part is that the story ended (for good) and there's no "next book" to get to. However, the sweet part is the closure, the conclusion of the journey, and the "freedom" to get to the next stories that await. That's what I felt during … Continue reading What happens after wiping out humanity: MaddAddam by Margaret Atwood (book review)